Turkish eggs

Hot from the new Indy Cafe Cookbook Volume 2, this on-trend brunch dish is surprisingly easy to recreate at home
Turkish eggs

Wojciech Borecki of Town Mill Bakery in Lyme Regis shares his recipe for turkish eggs

Serves    2

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FOOD Magazine issue 187

For the chilli butter:

  • Unsalted butter 200g
  • Olive oil 20ml
  • Smoked paprika 1 tsp
  • Chilli flakes 1½ tsp
  • Sea‑salt flakes to season

For the dukkah:

  • Sesame seeds 1½ tsp
  • Fennel seeds 1 tsp
  • Cumin seeds 1 tsp
  • Coriander seeds 2 tbsp
  • Hazelnuts 40g
  • Almonds 40g
  • Pistachios 40g, shelled
  • Cayenne pepper or paprika ½ tsp
  • Sea‑salt flakes a pinch

For the dill yogurt:

  • Greek yogurt 180ml
  • Dill 10g, chopped
  • Chives 10g, chopped
  • Sea‑salt flakes 1 tsp
  • Paprika 1½ tsp
  • Garlic powder 1½ tsp
  • Olive oil 10ml

To serve:

  • Free-range eggs 4, poached
  • Fresh herbs to taste
  • Avocado peeled, pitted and sliced
  • Sourdough sliced and toasted
  1. For the chilli butter: melt the butter in a heavy‑based saucepan over a very low heat. Discard the separated milk solids that rise to the top, leaving the transparent golden liquid. Don’t rush this step, it will take around 15‑20 minutes.
  2. Allow the clarified butter to cool in the pan, then add the olive oil. Stir in the paprika, chilli flakes and sea salt. Mix well and set aside.
  3. For the dukkah: in a pan, gently toast the seeds until lightly coloured and fragrant. Allow them to cool before transferring to a large pestle and mortar. Add the remaining dukkah ingredients and pound until crushed (alternatively, use a spice grinder).
  4. For the dill yogurt: mix all the ingredients together and spoon into the centre of two breakfast bowls. Gently warm the chilli butter while poaching the eggs.
  5. To serve: place two eggs on top of the dill yogurt, drizzle with chilli butter and sprinkle with dukkah and fresh herbs. Serve the turkish eggs with a couple of slices of avocado and toasted sourdough.

Find 40 coffee-shop-inspired brunch, lunch and baking recipes in the new Indy Cafe Cookbook Volume 2. Order your copy here

You will need

For the chilli butter:

  • Unsalted butter 200g
  • Olive oil 20ml
  • Smoked paprika 1 tsp
  • Chilli flakes 1½ tsp
  • Sea‑salt flakes to season

For the dukkah:

  • Sesame seeds 1½ tsp
  • Fennel seeds 1 tsp
  • Cumin seeds 1 tsp
  • Coriander seeds 2 tbsp
  • Hazelnuts 40g
  • Almonds 40g
  • Pistachios 40g, shelled
  • Cayenne pepper or paprika ½ tsp
  • Sea‑salt flakes a pinch

For the dill yogurt:

  • Greek yogurt 180ml
  • Dill 10g, chopped
  • Chives 10g, chopped
  • Sea‑salt flakes 1 tsp
  • Paprika 1½ tsp
  • Garlic powder 1½ tsp
  • Olive oil 10ml

To serve:

  • Free-range eggs 4, poached
  • Fresh herbs to taste
  • Avocado peeled, pitted and sliced
  • Sourdough sliced and toasted

Method

  1. For the chilli butter: melt the butter in a heavy‑based saucepan over a very low heat. Discard the separated milk solids that rise to the top, leaving the transparent golden liquid. Don’t rush this step, it will take around 15‑20 minutes.
  2. Allow the clarified butter to cool in the pan, then add the olive oil. Stir in the paprika, chilli flakes and sea salt. Mix well and set aside.
  3. For the dukkah: in a pan, gently toast the seeds until lightly coloured and fragrant. Allow them to cool before transferring to a large pestle and mortar. Add the remaining dukkah ingredients and pound until crushed (alternatively, use a spice grinder).
  4. For the dill yogurt: mix all the ingredients together and spoon into the centre of two breakfast bowls. Gently warm the chilli butter while poaching the eggs.
  5. To serve: place two eggs on top of the dill yogurt, drizzle with chilli butter and sprinkle with dukkah and fresh herbs. Serve the turkish eggs with a couple of slices of avocado and toasted sourdough.

Find 40 coffee-shop-inspired brunch, lunch and baking recipes in the new Indy Cafe Cookbook Volume 2. Order your copy here

Supported by
Churchill
Indy Coffee Box - Never have a bad coffee again

‘The chilli butter can be made in advance and will keep in the fridge for 1-2 weeks. The dukkah can be stored in an airtight container for 2-3 weeks', says Wojciech

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