Deep fried anchovies

These delicious deep fried anchovies with roast garlic mayonnaise make a great grazing dish
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Anchovies and garlic mayo

Tim Barnes, head chef at Outlaw’s Fish Kitchen in Port Isaac, shares his recipe for delicious deep fried anchovies with roast garlic mayonnaise

www.outlaws.co.uk

Serves    4

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Food July August
  • You will need
  • Method

For the anchovies:

  • Fresh anchovies 650g, gutted, cleaned and descaled
  • Plain flour 100g
  • Cornish sea salt to season
  • Ground white pepper to season
  • Sweet smoked paprika 2 tsp
  • Lemon 1

For the mayo:

  • Garlic 1 bulb
  • Egg yolks 6
  • White wine vinegar 20ml
  • English mustard 1 tsp
  • Rapeseed oil 700ml
  1. For the mayonnaise: place the whole garlic bulb on two sheets of tin foil and drizzle with a little oil. Season with salt and pepper and wrap tightly, forming a tin foil parcel. Place the parcel in a 160°c / gas 3 pre heated oven for 1 hour.
  2. Allow the garlic to cool for 15 minutes before opening the tin foil. While warm, cut the end of the garlic open and squeeze out the garlic puree. Pass through a sieve to ensure all the skins are removed.
  3. To make the mayonnaise, whisk together half the garlic puree, the egg yolks, white wine vinegar and mustard, and gradually add the oil until a thick mayonnaise forms. Add the remainder of the garlic puree to taste and season with salt. This can be kept for up to a day in the fridge.
  4. For the anchovies: season the flour with a good pinch of salt and pepper and toss the anchovies in the flour until well coated. Tap any excess flour off, and gently place 5 or 6 at a time into hot oil (around 180°c). Cook for 2 minutes then remove and place on kitchen towel. Repeat this process until all of the anchovies are cooked.
  5. Dust the hot anchovies with the smoked paprika and season with salt.
  6. Serve the fish with the mayonnaise and a wedge of fresh lemon.

You will need

For the anchovies:

  • Fresh anchovies 650g, gutted, cleaned and descaled
  • Plain flour 100g
  • Cornish sea salt to season
  • Ground white pepper to season
  • Sweet smoked paprika 2 tsp
  • Lemon 1

For the mayo:

  • Garlic 1 bulb
  • Egg yolks 6
  • White wine vinegar 20ml
  • English mustard 1 tsp
  • Rapeseed oil 700ml

Method

  1. For the mayonnaise: place the whole garlic bulb on two sheets of tin foil and drizzle with a little oil. Season with salt and pepper and wrap tightly, forming a tin foil parcel. Place the parcel in a 160°c / gas 3 pre heated oven for 1 hour.
  2. Allow the garlic to cool for 15 minutes before opening the tin foil. While warm, cut the end of the garlic open and squeeze out the garlic puree. Pass through a sieve to ensure all the skins are removed.
  3. To make the mayonnaise, whisk together half the garlic puree, the egg yolks, white wine vinegar and mustard, and gradually add the oil until a thick mayonnaise forms. Add the remainder of the garlic puree to taste and season with salt. This can be kept for up to a day in the fridge.
  4. For the anchovies: season the flour with a good pinch of salt and pepper and toss the anchovies in the flour until well coated. Tap any excess flour off, and gently place 5 or 6 at a time into hot oil (around 180°c). Cook for 2 minutes then remove and place on kitchen towel. Repeat this process until all of the anchovies are cooked.
  5. Dust the hot anchovies with the smoked paprika and season with salt.
  6. Serve the fish with the mayonnaise and a wedge of fresh lemon.
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