Orange and rosemary infused gin

Infuse gin at home in minutes with Yohann's fast-infusion method
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The Greenbank

Cocktail scientist Dave Arnold changed the game when he pioneered his rapid infusion technique to make all manner of flavour-infused spirits.

Yohann Thuillier, bar manager at The Greenbank, shares his recipe for orange and rosemary infused gin

www.greenbank-hotel.co.uk

Makes    1 bottle

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  • You will need
  • Method
  • Cream whipper 
  • Jug
  • Fine mesh strainer or muslin cloth
  • Nitrous oxide cartridges 2
  • Oranges 3 large, zested (avoid the pith as it will make the gin bitter)
  • Fresh rosemary 50g
  • Dry gin 70cl
  1. Place the orange zest and rosemary into the tin of the whipper, then pour in the gin.
  2. Screw the lid on and add the first cartridge of nitrous oxide.
  3. Shake well and wait for 20 minutes.
  4. Remove the first cartridge and add the second one (keeping the lid on).
  5. Let it rest for another 20 minutes.
  6. Remove the second cartridge and vent the whipper by depressing the lever. Cover the nozzle with the jug as it may spit some liquid out.
  7. Remove the lid. You should see the liquid bubbling, which means that the extraction is taking place.
  8. Once the liquid stops bubbling, strain the liquid into the jug. For an even clearer result, strain through a muslin cloth.
  9. Allow the infusion to rest for 10 minutes, then rebottle or use. It can be kept in the fridge for up to one week.

You will need

  • Cream whipper 
  • Jug
  • Fine mesh strainer or muslin cloth
  • Nitrous oxide cartridges 2
  • Oranges 3 large, zested (avoid the pith as it will make the gin bitter)
  • Fresh rosemary 50g
  • Dry gin 70cl

Method

  1. Place the orange zest and rosemary into the tin of the whipper, then pour in the gin.
  2. Screw the lid on and add the first cartridge of nitrous oxide.
  3. Shake well and wait for 20 minutes.
  4. Remove the first cartridge and add the second one (keeping the lid on).
  5. Let it rest for another 20 minutes.
  6. Remove the second cartridge and vent the whipper by depressing the lever. Cover the nozzle with the jug as it may spit some liquid out.
  7. Remove the lid. You should see the liquid bubbling, which means that the extraction is taking place.
  8. Once the liquid stops bubbling, strain the liquid into the jug. For an even clearer result, strain through a muslin cloth.
  9. Allow the infusion to rest for 10 minutes, then rebottle or use. It can be kept in the fridge for up to one week.
Supported by
Salcombe Gin & Paul Ainsworth
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'The more porous the ingredient, the easier it is to extract flavour,' says Yohann

Supported by
Salcombe Gin & Paul Ainsworth

Supported by

Salcombe Gin & Paul Ainsworth
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